Finding a Therapist

Image courtesy David Castillo Dominici at freedigitalphotos.net
Image courtesy David Castillo Dominici at freedigitalphotos.net

A little while back, one of my wonderful readers asked if I would write a post about finding a therapist who treats Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.  I thought that was a wonderful idea.  I know how confusing it can be to find a therapist to treat yourself or a loved one.  It’s tough for me – and I AM a psychologist with plenty of connections in the mental health community.  It can be that much more confusing when you don’t know the lingo or what to even look for.

What I am sharing here is a combination of my personal experience in obtaining treatment for Blake, as well as suggestions from wonderful resources such as the International OCD Foundation (http://ocfoundation.org), the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (http://www.adaa.org), and the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (http://www.abct.org). Please take it as just that, not as a perfect guide for finding a therapist.  Ultimately, it is best for you to make a carefully thought out decision that you determine fits you or your loved one best, perhaps with input from a medical or mental health professional who you trust.  That said, here are some thoughts I have:

Ask Professionals You Trust:

Many times, our own doctors or friends we know who are mental health professionals know people who treat OCD.  If there is a professional in your life who you trust, ask them.  When I reached out for help for Blake, I called another therapist friend who had noticed Blake’s OCD symptoms.  She had mentioned to me that she knew a child psychiatrist who specialized in OCD.  I am personally asked by friends and acquaintances all the time for referrals to therapists for different types of issues.  And I am very happy to assist if I am able.

Contact Professional Organizations:

Mental Health professionals who are dedicated to treating Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and anxiety disorders often belong to specialized organizations, such as the International OCD Foundation, the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, and/or the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies.  If you live in a country besides the United States or Canada, search for organizations in your country that are for therapists who specialize in treating OCD, anxiety, or in Cognitive Behavior Therapy.  Many of these have a part of their website where you can actually search for a therapist who specializes in treating OCD in your area – or nearby.  Or you can call the organization directly and they will help you locate a therapist.

Interview Therapists on the Phone:

Most therapists are happy to speak with you on the phone before you decide to make an appointment.  Choosing a therapist is a very personal decision and no one therapist fits all. If it is possible, speak to more than one therapist who treats OCD.  Ask questions about the therapist’s approach to treating OCD, as well as their training and background.  Specifically, are they trained in Cognitive Behavior Therapy – Exposure and Response Prevention?  Find out how loved ones are included (or not) in treatment.  How much of their practice is devoted to treating OCD, or anxiety disorders?  What is their attitude about medication (experts will generally say that it is best if the therapist is open to it as a potentially beneficial part of treatment)?

When I made that first call to the psychiatrist, he personally phoned me back and took time to assess the situation.  Based on what I shared, he believed that Blake could begin with a psychologist (which would also be more cost effective) and he referred me to one.  That therapist also personally returned my call and spoke with me about the situation before we decided to proceed with treatment.

Assess Your Own Level of Comfort:

When you’ve interviewed a therapist, ask yourself how comfortable or confident you feel about the therapist.  This is important.  This is someone you, or your child, will be sharing personal information with and who will be asking you (or them) to do things that make you feel uncomfortable.  It is essential that you feel comfortable and confident in order to create a strong working relationship.

I recall having felt so heard on the telephone, both by the psychologist, who we ultimately saw, and by the psychiatrist we spoke to first.  The psychologist even spent time educating me about OCD during our conversation and referred me to a helpful website and to books that I could order that would help me to help Blake.  Before we ever met, I was confident that both individuals could help my son and our family.

Educate Yourself:

This is not so much about finding a therapist, but it will certainly help.  One of the best recommendations I received when we realized that Blake had OCD was to read about OCD from reputable sources, like the International OCD Foundation, and to obtain books on treating OCD in children.  Learning about the disorder yourself helps you to know what to expect from treatment and to understand what is happening in therapy and why.

These are just a few thoughts I have about finding a therapist.  I hope that they are helpful.  Here are a couple links to more information on finding a therapist to treat OCD:

– International OCD Foundation:  How to Find the Right Therapist

– Anxiety and Depression Association of America:  Choosing a Therapist

 

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