His Own Initiative

Our oldest, Michael, left the country one week ago today with excitement over studying and living in another country and a passion to become more fluent in another language. The hubby cried as he hugged our son goodbye, then cried more as we drove home, and once again as he searched birthday card after birthday card in pursuit of a suitable one for our younger son, Blake’s, nineteenth birthday. The hubby’s tears reflected many things: the sadness at watching Michael leave after several weeks in which they spent many close moments together, the bittersweet realization that we will be empty-nesters in a few short weeks, the juxtaposition of the personalities of our two young men – one who craves new experiences in the world and one for whom his bed and our sofa seem experience enough.

Michael’s parting recommendation to his brother had been that he begin to venture out into the world, that he practice the skills he will need when he moves to college in another state next month. He’d worried lovingly about his brother and whether he’d have the skills to live in his new environment. He’d proposed a plan to his brother in which Blake would go out of the house, perhaps a couple of times each week, so that he might gain experience and confidence, and perhaps a little momentum. Blake initially embraced the idea, but it quickly seemed to fall flat as I wrote about in my previous post (“A Plan That Lost Steam“). Depression and anxiety seemed to win out.

A Flash of Hope

I had resigned myself that Blake was not going to follow the plan he and his brother had plotted out. I expected to see him step back from life even more. The hubby and I were true to what we had promised and did not bring the plan back up. To be honest, I even stepped back on our therapy-planned morning routine of waking Blake up. Sure, I still saw that he got up and out of his room, but with much less rigidity and urgency. I felt deflated and spent time searching my mind as to how I would live as meaningfully as possible regardless of what would come with either of my sons in the months ahead.

Still, there were things to be done before Blake can leave for college. There were apartment supplies to be ordered and bank accounts to be transferred (Blake still only had a custodial account in my name). So, I continued to go through the motions of preparing for the move. On Monday morning, Blake and I prepared to go to the bank to get things in order so that he might obtain the all-important debit card.

“Do you want to go grab a coffee afterward?” I asked him just before we left.

“Oh, I was planning to go there myself as a way to get out today. You know, like we talked about with Michael. Is that okay?”

I was a bit startled, a little excited, but tried not to show it.

“Of course,” I said. “Do you want to take separate cars and meet me at the mall, then? We can walk over to the bank, then grab a coffee, and I then I can leave so you can have your time.”

So, we did. Blake navigated his way to the mall parking lot and we met up and walked to the bank and completed the business of transferring his account into his name. Then we walked back to the coffee shop, where I grabbed an iced coffee and quickly made myself scarce. Blake set up his computer at a table.

“I wish I’d brought a chess board,” he noted. “I’d ask someone here to play with me.”

When I got home, I dashed off an email to the hubby at work: “Thought you’d want to know…

And Then Another

On Thursday, he did it again.

“Mom, since we need to go out on another college planning errand today, can I use it as a way to launch into going out on my own again? It kind of helps ease me into it. I mean, since we are going out already, I can just go off on my own when we’re done. I’d like to go to the board game store.”

“Sure, honey. Let’s meet up at the store. We’ll pick out supplies and then you can head on your way,” I’d suggested.

About a half hour later, Blake showed up to meet me.

“Twenty-five minutes to find my way here!” Blake shook his head.

“Hey, you found it and you did it safely,” I replied.

Then we proceeded to giggle our way through the store, Blake being more frugal than I, me reasoning that the slow cooker he was choosing was going to be too small. As we finished, I bid him fun on his adventure. A couple of hours later, he was back home. He’d completed his mission, and had even observed a group at the store playing a Dungeons and Dragons game.

“I tried to join in,” he said, “but they were already too far in. They have a board game night there every other Thursday.”

Whether Blake will continue his missions out into the world we shall see. This week, my son, the one who prefers his bed and the family room couch, went out twice – for no reason other than to practice doing it. No one cajoled him or made suggestions. He just did it himself. While we cannot show great excitement because we know, from experience, that this will just send him back into hiding, this weekend the hubby and I are doing happy dances when no one is looking.

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12 thoughts on “His Own Initiative

  1. Karyn

    Oh, I’m so happy for you and for Blake! What great strides! This gives me hope for my son, too. He’s 14 and we’re currently on vacation in Florida and he’s barely leaving his room here due to the restrictions his OCD puts on him.

    1. Thank you, Karyn. Oh, I am sending good vibes out to you and your son (and your family). We’ve definitely been there where OCD put restrictions on what could be done. With time and with treatment it can definitely get so much better. – Angie

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