Showdown and Shooting

Brand new baby box turtles

I found last week a difficult week to post. Blake and I had some serious run-ins, and our community was greatly affected by the massacre in Las Vegas. My attention was on home and community and I’m just now feeling like I can give a bit of attention to my blog.

On the Homefront

Blake continues to attend therapy, yet he is really not completely on board. I heard last week that the hubby and I “smother” him – his term. It’s probably true.

“You and so many others keep trying to help me. It’s like life rings are getting thrown at me from so many directions. I’m overwhelmed. And I almost feel like drowning just to get you to leave me alone!” he told me one evening.

I told him I appreciated knowing that he feels smothered by us.

“I feel like I’ve never done anything on my own. I wish you guys would throw me out so I’d be on the street and prove that I can make it.”

“I get it that you want to prove that you can make it, Blake. It just makes me wonder, does the only way you’ll be able to take charge of your own life and make of it what you want have to involve living on the street? Or can it happen with a roof over your head and food to eat?”

When our therapist heard Blake’s reasoning for continuing to resist getting better, he commented, “I guess you’ve got a lot of evidence to prove that continuing to drown does not get people to back off.”

Then he kicked the hubby and I out of the therapy office and met with Blake alone – which was actually quite nice, oddly enough.

In the Community

While Blake was begging for us to leave him alone, the community came calling. Thirty-six hours after the Las Vegas shooting, a colleague reached out. At least ten members of our community had been shot. Many more had been at the Route 91 festival.

“Can you let me know of any Las Vegas debriefing sessions in {our community}? I have one client who was there…another coming in. You are so connected. I know you may hear of something.”

Up until that point, I’d felt helpless. As a psychologist, I know the effects of an event such as this, but I didn’t know how I could help. Suddenly, I knew. I contacted our local community mental health center, a place I used to work and serve on the board of directors. I asked whether they would be offering any community support events. Two days later, I found myself on a panel discussing ways to cope, how to help our children, what we might expect in the days and weeks ahead.

The next thing I knew, I was publicizing support events to our local mental health community, listening to survivors’ stories, showing up on the local news, and connecting those with the resources to those who needed it. Someone added me to a Facebook group for survivors and helpers. There are nearly 350 people in that group. How did so many of our community members happen to be at this event? It felt like a mission. I became consumed with helping.

…And then I kind of crashed. I don’t know if it was compassion fatigue, but I needed to disengage for a bit from the tension in the house and the craziness in the world.

New Life

Just when I felt at my lowest, nature sent me a gift. I stepped into our backyard just before a meeting and was greeted by two, silver-dollar sized baby box turtles. For a moment, my heart raced with joy. Three months ago, I watched in amazement as my thirty-something-year-old turtle laid a clutch of eggs and buried them in her enclosure. Now, two hatchlings sat in the yard, covered in dirt – a beautiful reminder of how life renews itself. A chance for me to step back and breathe.

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OCD and the Importance of Specialists

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The voice on the other end of the line is searching for an answer. She knows there is another way. There has to be. I’m speaking to a woman. I don’t know her age. I only know that she’s self-diagnosed with OCD and she is looking for help. Her plea to me draws me in; this is what I’m passionate about: helping people with OCD find help and get better. At the same time, the call leaves me furious. Something inside of me demands, “Something must be done about this!

A little background. I am the parent of a young adult with OCD. I am also a clinical psychologist. Several years after my son’s OCD diagnosis and successful treatment, I sought out training and began to specialize in the treatment of OCD. I did not want other families to go through what we did. Heck, I was a psychologist and I had had no clue about OCD. I’d been lucky to find help through my psychology connections. How were people without a psychology background to know the “what’s,” “why’s,” and “how’s” of OCD?

The Woman on the Line

The woman I’m speaking to is resourceful. She’s figured out that there’s a name for the disturbing thoughts that go through her mind, and for the anxiety and discomfort created by them. It’s called Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. She is troubled by fears that she will harm herself in some way. She does not wish to harm herself. The thoughts terrify her. She wants to learn to deal with them in a better way, rather than spending great amounts of time ruminating. What she describes to me sounds a great deal like a theme that the OCD community has dubbed “Harm OCD.” It’s a fairly common OCD theme.

“I wanted to use my health insurance,” she tells me. “I went to see a therapist who wasn’t an OCD specialist, but he seemed professional enough.”

What followed was anything but a pleasant experience. When she told the therapist that she believed she had OCD and that her obsessions centered around thoughts of harming herself, the therapist told her that there was no such thing as the disorder she was talking about. His reasoning? He had never heard of it.

He told me I was suicidal and that the thoughts were just fragmented pieces of myself that I’d disowned,” she lamented.

“Let me guess,” I said. “The thoughts and the anxiety only got worse then.”

“Yes!” she responded with fervor.

“This is a frequent problem we see in the OCD community when people see therapists who are not specialists in treating OCD.”

Our talk continued with me providing resources, referrals, and information on finding a specialist to work with her. I trust that she will get into proper treatment and get the help she needs.

The Uninformed Psychology Community

Being immersed in the OCD community, I sometimes forget that the psychology and psychiatry community as a whole can be misinformed about OCD. Although I have never met this woman to be able to diagnose her, nor was I present to witness what happened in the consultation room, what she describes matches what many with OCD describe on their road to finding diagnosis and treatment. Not all mental health professionals are trained to diagnose or treat OCD. When a person has OCD, it is a specialist they must see.

People trust therapists and psychiatrists to be able to identify what is wrong and to be able to treat them. If their diagnosis is OCD, and if it manifests in a way that does not reflect what tends to be shown in the media, the diagnosis can be missed. What’s more, the treatment provided can end up making things even worse, as this woman shared. When she noted that she thought she had harm OCD and was told that that did not exist, it made her doubt and despair even greater.

What frustrates me is when mental health professionals do not admit that OCD is not their specialty, or when they are not willing to listen to the person in the room with them. A quick search on Google for “harm OCD” led me to over 700,000 results in less than a second. A search for “OCD suicidal obsessions” leads to nearly 300,000 results (my friend, Janet, at OCDtalk wrote an article on the subject last year).

Getting Help

The woman I spoke with was informed. She had done her research and she knew what she likely had. It was her reluctance to go outside of her insurance (or, perhaps better, to stand up to her insurance provider and ask that they approve her seeing an OCD specialist since there are none on her panel nearby) that led her to not getting the appropriate treatment. It’s not that the therapist she saw is not a talented professional; they just were not likely informed about OCD.

If you believe that you, or a loved one, have OCD, seek out a specialist. The International OCD Foundation has published a great article called, “How to Find the Right Therapist.” Both the International OCD Foundation and the Anxiety and Depression Association of America have features to help consumers find therapists. Starting with a specialist can help an OCD sufferer avoid wasted time spent in treatment that does not help. If there are no specialists in your area who take your insurance, you still have options. Perhaps there is a therapist on your insurance who is out of your immediate area, but provides therapy via secure video (they must be licensed in your state and your insurance company may or may not authorize this kind of treatment). Perhaps your insurance company can make an exception and authorize treatment outside of network. Additionally, if finances are an issue, do not be afraid to ask providers if they can provide you therapy at a reduced fee you can afford. There are many who will.

Above all, this is your health and your life. Getting the appropriate treatment is important. Do not stay in a treatment situation that feels inappropriate, or with a mental health professional who does not understand OCD, or who will not look at valid articles you point them to on the subject. OCD is treatable – and getting the right treatment is key to recovery.

 

 

 

OCD is Treatable

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This week, as I was thinking about this blog, it occurred to me that something has been missing from my posts for some time. That “thing” is the notion that Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder is treatable; that there is hope for sufferers, their families, and those who care for them. That OCD is treatable was core to my very intentions behind creating this blog – and I fear that, lost in our situation lately, I’ve forgotten to mention this all-important point recently.

Anyone who is new to this blog may not know the history of OCD in our family. They may not have read my initial post in which I explained that our teenage son, Blake, through participation in treatment, had once lived a life where OCD had become a thing of the past. They may not know that I started this blog as a place to give my emotions and thoughts about our experience an outlet, lest I let them flow in front of Blake, who was refusing treatment at the time. They may not know that this blog began with the eternal hope that Blake, given some space, would decide to return to treatment and beat OCD back into oblivion once again.

I want readers to know that the situation we currently face, one in which our now eighteen-year-old frequently barely functions, is not a typical situation for a young man with OCD. I’m not saying that this does not happen when people do not get treatment. It obviously can happen. Blake, however, besides dealing with OCD, got hit by a tremendous bout of Major Depression – and it took us a while to find a professional who thought he could help even though Blake believed he was beyond being helped. Now we are all in treatment again, and we are peeling back the layers little-by-little with the hope that things will get better again. That is what I’ve been documenting lately.

At the same time, it is important for sufferers, or anyone reading this blog, to know that OCD is treatable. I know this as a mother who has been through cognitive behavior therapy/exposure with response prevention (CBT-ERP) with her son and seen amazing results. I know this as a therapist who has the true honor of watching her patients, young and old, show OCD the door and reclaim their lives. I know this as a reader of many blogs and an attendee at many conferences. People can and do get better from OCD. There is every reason to have hope.

If you continue to follow this blog, you will likely observe our family stumble and struggle. That’s just where we are right now. Yet, I continue to have hope that our son will get better once he can see that there is a light at the end of the tunnel. Thus, our journey continues. Thank you for bearing witness.

To view helpful information about effective OCD treatment, or to see stories about positive outcomes, I’ve listed a few helpful links below:

Finding a Therapist

Image courtesy David Castillo Dominici at freedigitalphotos.net
Image courtesy David Castillo Dominici at freedigitalphotos.net

A little while back, one of my wonderful readers asked if I would write a post about finding a therapist who treats Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.  I thought that was a wonderful idea.  I know how confusing it can be to find a therapist to treat yourself or a loved one.  It’s tough for me – and I AM a psychologist with plenty of connections in the mental health community.  It can be that much more confusing when you don’t know the lingo or what to even look for.

What I am sharing here is a combination of my personal experience in obtaining treatment for Blake, as well as suggestions from wonderful resources such as the International OCD Foundation (http://ocfoundation.org), the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (http://www.adaa.org), and the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (http://www.abct.org). Please take it as just that, not as a perfect guide for finding a therapist.  Ultimately, it is best for you to make a carefully thought out decision that you determine fits you or your loved one best, perhaps with input from a medical or mental health professional who you trust.  That said, here are some thoughts I have:

Ask Professionals You Trust:

Many times, our own doctors or friends we know who are mental health professionals know people who treat OCD.  If there is a professional in your life who you trust, ask them.  When I reached out for help for Blake, I called another therapist friend who had noticed Blake’s OCD symptoms.  She had mentioned to me that she knew a child psychiatrist who specialized in OCD.  I am personally asked by friends and acquaintances all the time for referrals to therapists for different types of issues.  And I am very happy to assist if I am able.

Contact Professional Organizations:

Mental Health professionals who are dedicated to treating Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and anxiety disorders often belong to specialized organizations, such as the International OCD Foundation, the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, and/or the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies.  If you live in a country besides the United States or Canada, search for organizations in your country that are for therapists who specialize in treating OCD, anxiety, or in Cognitive Behavior Therapy.  Many of these have a part of their website where you can actually search for a therapist who specializes in treating OCD in your area – or nearby.  Or you can call the organization directly and they will help you locate a therapist.

Interview Therapists on the Phone:

Most therapists are happy to speak with you on the phone before you decide to make an appointment.  Choosing a therapist is a very personal decision and no one therapist fits all. If it is possible, speak to more than one therapist who treats OCD.  Ask questions about the therapist’s approach to treating OCD, as well as their training and background.  Specifically, are they trained in Cognitive Behavior Therapy – Exposure and Response Prevention?  Find out how loved ones are included (or not) in treatment.  How much of their practice is devoted to treating OCD, or anxiety disorders?  What is their attitude about medication (experts will generally say that it is best if the therapist is open to it as a potentially beneficial part of treatment)?

When I made that first call to the psychiatrist, he personally phoned me back and took time to assess the situation.  Based on what I shared, he believed that Blake could begin with a psychologist (which would also be more cost effective) and he referred me to one.  That therapist also personally returned my call and spoke with me about the situation before we decided to proceed with treatment.

Assess Your Own Level of Comfort:

When you’ve interviewed a therapist, ask yourself how comfortable or confident you feel about the therapist.  This is important.  This is someone you, or your child, will be sharing personal information with and who will be asking you (or them) to do things that make you feel uncomfortable.  It is essential that you feel comfortable and confident in order to create a strong working relationship.

I recall having felt so heard on the telephone, both by the psychologist, who we ultimately saw, and by the psychiatrist we spoke to first.  The psychologist even spent time educating me about OCD during our conversation and referred me to a helpful website and to books that I could order that would help me to help Blake.  Before we ever met, I was confident that both individuals could help my son and our family.

Educate Yourself:

This is not so much about finding a therapist, but it will certainly help.  One of the best recommendations I received when we realized that Blake had OCD was to read about OCD from reputable sources, like the International OCD Foundation, and to obtain books on treating OCD in children.  Learning about the disorder yourself helps you to know what to expect from treatment and to understand what is happening in therapy and why.

These are just a few thoughts I have about finding a therapist.  I hope that they are helpful.  Here are a couple links to more information on finding a therapist to treat OCD:

– International OCD Foundation:  How to Find the Right Therapist

– Anxiety and Depression Association of America:  Choosing a Therapist