His Own Initiative

Our oldest, Michael, left the country one week ago today with excitement over studying and living in another country and a passion to become more fluent in another language. The hubby cried as he hugged our son goodbye, then cried more as we drove home, and once again as he searched birthday card after birthday card in pursuit of a suitable one for our younger son, Blake’s, nineteenth birthday. The hubby’s tears reflected many things: the sadness at watching Michael leave after several weeks in which they spent many close moments together, the bittersweet realization that we will be empty-nesters in a few short weeks, the juxtaposition of the personalities of our two young men – one who craves new experiences in the world and one for whom his bed and our sofa seem experience enough.

Michael’s parting recommendation to his brother had been that he begin to venture out into the world, that he practice the skills he will need when he moves to college in another state next month. He’d worried lovingly about his brother and whether he’d have the skills to live in his new environment. He’d proposed a plan to his brother in which Blake would go out of the house, perhaps a couple of times each week, so that he might gain experience and confidence, and perhaps a little momentum. Blake initially embraced the idea, but it quickly seemed to fall flat as I wrote about in my previous post (“A Plan That Lost Steam“). Depression and anxiety seemed to win out.

A Flash of Hope

I had resigned myself that Blake was not going to follow the plan he and his brother had plotted out. I expected to see him step back from life even more. The hubby and I were true to what we had promised and did not bring the plan back up. To be honest, I even stepped back on our therapy-planned morning routine of waking Blake up. Sure, I still saw that he got up and out of his room, but with much less rigidity and urgency. I felt deflated and spent time searching my mind as to how I would live as meaningfully as possible regardless of what would come with either of my sons in the months ahead.

Still, there were things to be done before Blake can leave for college. There were apartment supplies to be ordered and bank accounts to be transferred (Blake still only had a custodial account in my name). So, I continued to go through the motions of preparing for the move. On Monday morning, Blake and I prepared to go to the bank to get things in order so that he might obtain the all-important debit card.

“Do you want to go grab a coffee afterward?” I asked him just before we left.

“Oh, I was planning to go there myself as a way to get out today. You know, like we talked about with Michael. Is that okay?”

I was a bit startled, a little excited, but tried not to show it.

“Of course,” I said. “Do you want to take separate cars and meet me at the mall, then? We can walk over to the bank, then grab a coffee, and I then I can leave so you can have your time.”

So, we did. Blake navigated his way to the mall parking lot and we met up and walked to the bank and completed the business of transferring his account into his name. Then we walked back to the coffee shop, where I grabbed an iced coffee and quickly made myself scarce. Blake set up his computer at a table.

“I wish I’d brought a chess board,” he noted. “I’d ask someone here to play with me.”

When I got home, I dashed off an email to the hubby at work: “Thought you’d want to know…

And Then Another

On Thursday, he did it again.

“Mom, since we need to go out on another college planning errand today, can I use it as a way to launch into going out on my own again? It kind of helps ease me into it. I mean, since we are going out already, I can just go off on my own when we’re done. I’d like to go to the board game store.”

“Sure, honey. Let’s meet up at the store. We’ll pick out supplies and then you can head on your way,” I’d suggested.

About a half hour later, Blake showed up to meet me.

“Twenty-five minutes to find my way here!” Blake shook his head.

“Hey, you found it and you did it safely,” I replied.

Then we proceeded to giggle our way through the store, Blake being more frugal than I, me reasoning that the slow cooker he was choosing was going to be too small. As we finished, I bid him fun on his adventure. A couple of hours later, he was back home. He’d completed his mission, and had even observed a group at the store playing a Dungeons and Dragons game.

“I tried to join in,” he said, “but they were already too far in. They have a board game night there every other Thursday.”

Whether Blake will continue his missions out into the world we shall see. This week, my son, the one who prefers his bed and the family room couch, went out twice – for no reason other than to practice doing it. No one cajoled him or made suggestions. He just did it himself. While we cannot show great excitement because we know, from experience, that this will just send him back into hiding, this weekend the hubby and I are doing happy dances when no one is looking.

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A Plan That Lost Steam

Michael, our 21-year-old, is getting ready to leave to study abroad for the remainder of this summer. He sat the hubby and I down the other day and told us he was worried about Blake’s emotional state and his upcoming move out of state to begin college.

“He’s really not ready to go,” Michael observed. “He feels like a disappointment to you guys, especially when it seems that everything is based on whether he gets up in the morning or not. And he doesn’t respond well to tough love. It just makes him shut down more.”

“So what are you thinking?” I asked him, as the three of us sat on our back patio.

“I think he needs a mission, a purpose. You know, little tasks to get him out of the house. Things he needs to practice to live away from home. He can go buy his groceries so you can get an idea now what he’ll need to spend on them and so that he’ll get used to buying what he needs. And he can go to the library or the coffee shop and set up his computer and practice writing from there. You could give him a small stipend each week so he could practice. I think it would make him feel accomplished. But,” Michael continued, “I don’t think it should come from you guys.”

“What do you propose?” asked the hubby.

“I’ll talk with him tonight,” Michael noted. “I’ll see what he thinks and help him to make it his. If it’s his idea, he might be willing.”

So, we parted leaving this between the boys.

Michael Makes Inroads

The next morning, Blake stopped me early.

“Mom,” he said, “Michael and I were talking last night about ways for me to get ready to leave for school. Can we talk with you and Dad tonight about it? I think it’s a good plan.”

“Sure,” I answered. I tried to sound calmly enthusiastic, but inside I was kind of excited. Was my son who regularly chooses bed and the sofa to leaving the home actually wanting to launch a little bit?

The four of us met last night and Michael and Blake led the talk. Michael shared how doing these kinds of things would have helped him make the transition a little easier when he left for college. He thought it would give Blake more confidence to live in the world

And Then I Watched it Happen…

Blake went from mildly enthusiastic to questioning to looking downright terrified. He started finding reasons it wasn’t a good idea. He started worrying he’d be judged and held to this standard. He worried he’d fail. It didn’t matter what anyone said. The hubby and I noted we wouldn’t hold him to anything. It was his plan, and if he followed it, we would cheer him on. If he did not, we wouldn’t comment. Michael stayed positive and light and shared how beneficial it could be. I was proud of how he held his own and supported his brother. In the end, we left it that Blake could decide whether he did it or not.

And then, as I got ready for bed, he called me into his room.

“It’s just so hard to get out of bed,” he said, staring off into space. “Bed is the only place that feels good. It’s like having a hug and having to leave it. Nothing in the day feels good and I just distract myself with YouTube or games all day. And then it’s even hard to go back to bed knowing I’ll have to do the same thing again tomorrow. Living is hard and I’m too scared to die – so I’m just in that in between space.”

And there was little more I knew to do for my son than listen, acknowledge, and snuggle him with a tight squeeze until he dismissed me with a, “Good night, Mom.” For all my professional training and experience, I do not know how to move my own son from here to there. And right now, I don’t know that there is anyone else who knows how to either.

We Have to Want It Less Than They Do

Image courtesy of Nanhatai8 at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

This week I attended a daylong community OCD event. The venue was completely full, there were terrific speakers, and there were lots of opportunities to connect. At the end of the day, there was a gathering to re-cap and ask questions. One parent stood up to ask a question that grabbed my heart and my attention.

The parent asked about a topic that is near to many of us who have young adult (or almost-adult) children struggling with OCD (or other mental health issues). That is, the parent wanted to know how to motivate one’s older teen or young adult to get serious and use the treatment being offered to them. I immediately felt a kinship to this parent. I wanted to reach across the crowded room and say, “Yes, I want to know that, too. You are not alone.” Yet my heart already knew the answer that was about to come.

A therapist at the front of the room took the question and tenderly noted, “I notice that many times parents want desperately for their child to get better. Yet that seems to keep the child or young adult from wanting it for themselves. They have to want to get better more than their parents want them to get better.”

And there it was. A simple truth. We parents can want what we want for our children. We can lead them to treatment. We can urge, press, plead, make deals…but we can’t be doing more work than they are. We cannot be more invested than they are. We have to want their recovery LESS than they do.

My heart feels heavy for just a bit as I hear what I already know. And my heart aches for the parent on the other side of the room. How do we do this? How do we care less when they don’t seem to care much at all (at least on the surface)? I think the answer is that we have to find a meaningful life for ourselves in spite of their mental health struggles. I think that we have to back off on the pressure and put faith in their ability to decide when enough is enough. And we have to have the courage to not pick up the pieces and make the consequences of their struggle easier – they have to be doing much of the hard work.

This is simple, in theory, but difficult in practice. As parents, we are programmed to respond to our child when we see them suffering. We are oriented toward providing comfort and to removing obstacles. With OCD, anyway, doing our job as parent may be presenting them with the difficult path toward healing, and waiting nearby allowing them the struggle of coming to the decision that there is a better life to be lived.

I Matter, Too

Image courtesy of digidreamgrafix at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

“More importantly, how are you doing?”

This question from Blake’s therapist takes me by surprise and throws me off balance for a moment. Blake has just walked out of the room, shutting the door behind him. Nature calling. I’m just finishing paying for the session, thinking I’m about to walk out the door, too. The therapist isn’t quite done yet.

“What do you think?” he asks, and then he points out, “He’s talking about serious stuff now.”

He’s correct. Blake only started coming to therapy when he wanted to take some control of the interventions his therapist, his dad, and I were implementing. He was angry. He came to bargain. In recent sessions, he’s talked about depression, his dislike for himself – just the mere concept of “Blake,” about his disconnection from the world. Today was no exception and, as has begun to be our routine, I sat like a fly on the wall watching the interaction between Blake and The Doc, wondering what I was doing in there. Although the therapist in me is fascinated by observing what’s going on.

It’s Not About Me, Right?

We’ve been seeing this therapist in hopes that our 18-year-old can overcome his OCD and severe depression and ready himself to live in the world.  So I just didn’t expect it when the therapist asked about me.

“I have good days and not so good days,” I answer.

“Well that’s a pretty non-specific answer,” the therapist says with a smile.

“I worry about him,” I say, “but I’m learning patience.”

The truth is, I’m kind of disconnected about how I am. I’ve been so mesmerized by the therapy session, I lost myself a bit. It’s only later in the day, as I ponder the question, “More importantly, how are you doing?” that I think over my frustration at watching my son climb back into bed multiple times each morning. It’s later that I recall the heartbreak at hearing my son talk about how life isn’t worth the good moments when he considers how awful the bad moments are. It’s later that I remember part of me sinking inside as I watch my son wash his hands immediately after handling money or tiptoeing around areas that the dogs might have contaminated.

At the same time, I’m touched by The Doc’s inquiry. As much as my son is suffering, family members are, themselves, affected when their loved one has OCD, depression, or other mental illnesses. If we aren’t directly involved in rituals, or trying to get them out of bed, we are worrying about them. So I’m appreciative of this simple act of kindness and caring. It resonates in me. It reminds me that we family members have to remember to care for ourselves in the face of our loved ones’ struggles. We have to be mindful of our own well-being. If we aren’t, we can become impatient, bitter, angry – basically of little use in this war called mental illness.

So, thank you, kind therapist, for reminding me that I matter, too. It opened something up inside of me and I feel just a little more alive and grounded. I feel less stuck in the mess with my son, and more like myself. And this morning, when I allowed myself to take a long hike in the nearby mountains, I was just a little more open to taking in the scenery and appreciating it, instead of having the specter of depression and OCD hanging over me. Yes, I matter, too.

When Words Don’t Mean What We Think They Do

I was recently reminded that some of the most simple things we say to one another, words that are meant to inspire, connect, or that are simple formalities, can mean something very different to someone struggling with depression or other mental health issues. On a daily basis, there are words that pop out of our mouths out of habit. We usually don’t give them much thought, yet just last week, Blake gave me a window into a different perspective on words that I use.

“There’s something that I’ve been struggling with a lot recently,” Blake says. “People keep asking me how I’m doing.”

“Yes, they do that,” I say.

“Well, the thing is. I’m not sure what to say. I mean, what do you say when the answer to that question, ‘How are you?’ is, ‘I’d rather be dead?’ I don’t think that’s what people want to hear.”

He repeats this quandary to his therapist.

“Yes. It’s one of those formalities,” the therapist says. “I sometimes answer, ‘More or less.’ It confuses them.”

Blake laughs at this response, and then says, “There’s another thing people say. When things go wrong they say, ‘That’s life.’ ” Then he sighs and hangs his head. “That’s life.”

An entire conversation about depression ensued after that, but I took something away from those moments. It made me realize, more than ever, the power of words and how they may be construed by someone who is profoundly depressed. I realized that by saying “That’s life” to someone who is struggling to find even one reason to live, I may be reinforcing that life is nothing more than a series of bad stuff. I may be reinforcing the view of a world the depressed individual already finds so oppressive, so defeating. “That’s life. First it sucks, then it sucks more.”

I also thought about the power of asking, “How are you?” When we ask, do we really want to know? I thought of the depressed individual knowing what the socially appropriate answer is, and recognizing that, by giving it, they are telling a lie. Maybe there’s the feeling of being a misfit in a world where most people seem to be able to answer, “Good,” or “Fine.” Perhaps there’s a desire to say how awful they feel, but not wanting to be rejected for saying so.

I’m not suggesting we stop asking, “How are you?” Nor am I implying that we should drop, “That’s life,” as an expression when we want to explain to someone that the world is not perfect. I’m just taking a step into another frame of reference and, perhaps, taking you there with me for a moment. I just hadn’t ever realized quite the way my profoundly depressed 18-year-old son hears things, and I was given the opportunity to step into his perspective ever-so-briefly.

Of course, for Blake, it doesn’t end there. In his therapy, he is learning how to respond to the “How are you’s.” He is learning that there are some people he can be honest with, and other instances where he might give a social answer. He is also learning to challenge his view of the world. He is learning that “life” is not made all dark by some challenging moments. He is learning that there are shades of gray, and he is even beginning to notice moments of joy. For his father and I, it is a privilege to share in the journey.

I Don’t Want To, But I Have To

“I really don’t want to be here, but I have to…”

It’s another Thursday afternoon and, as usual, Blake, the hubby, and I are sitting in our therapist’s office. In what’s become a more and more commonplace occurrence, the hubby and I are sitting quietly on the sofa. Blake is in a chair hunched over his knees. The therapist is sitting close to Blake and is locked in conversation with him.

I’m not sure why the hubby and I are in the room sometimes, lately, but Blake wants us in there. The hubby allows his eyes to close; I think that’s how he focuses on the intimate conversation taking place to our left.

The topic, as it has been lately, is depression. Blake is describing the all-too-familiar pattern of following his depressed, dark thoughts down an endless rabbit hole of despair. Our therapist is gently directing Blake toward possibly confronting this pattern. Blake shares his perception of life holding no positive meaning. Suddenly, he seems a little breathless.

“This is really uncomfortable to talk about,” he notes. “I really don’t want to talk about it, but I have to.”

I watch him gather himself and continue. He pauses again, later – and, again, he comments. “I don’t want to, but I have to.”

I take this as a sign of bravery, a sign that Blake recognizes that, in order to gain the upper hand on his depression and his OCD, he has some very uncomfortable work to do. Later, I ask him about it, and he confirms this interpretation to me. Blake understands that he must share how he thinks, even though it is incredibly uncomfortable, so that he can move forward and begin the process of healing.

Honestly, this is remarkable to witness. We, as a family, have been though years of struggle. We’ve watched Blake succumb to OCD thinking, and then to depression. He has battled facing anything that is even the slightest bit uncomfortable. Yet, now, at age 18, there are glimmers of willingness to do the hard work – to fight for a life worth living. I recognize that there will be more struggles and steps backward, and that this will be a process. Yet, this is new and it is something I don’t think I’ve ever seen in my son before. I am so very proud of him.

This Week

“How was this week?” our therapist asks Blake.

“It was a little better,” Blake replies.

I don’t think I’ve heard those words out of Blake in two years. Maybe more. The final year of high school was a struggle to the finish. The summer was a descent into days spent with my newly graduated young adult sleeping all day (sometimes until 10 p.m.) and awake all night. He was angry with us, but couldn’t show it most of the time. We had taken college from him because he hadn’t been ready to leave home and now life seemed useless to him. Days were nothing but drudgery – nothing to look forward to.

Six months ago, Blake, struggling with both Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Major Depression, refused to attend therapy. When his father and I went alone and started acting more like parents, setting limits and applying consequences that made little sense to him, it got his attention. He came to therapy grudgingly, but determined to get us off his back, and to take back some control.

Little by little, he started to be awake more of each day – most days (there are still setbacks, for sure). He started to create a schedule for himself. For weeks and weeks he fought the schedule, but then it started to get a little exciting. This past week, he completed a short story and it actually felt good. It’s a horror story and, truth be told, it’s compelling and terrifying (yes, he actually let me and the hubby read it).

Dealing With Depression

When we went to therapy one week ago, Blake shared with our therapist about his depression loop.

“I feel lousy and then I realize that it’s stupid to feel depressed about what I feel depressed about. So, I get upset with myself for being depressed…”

“And then you keep going on a downward spiral,” the therapist noted.

“Yes,” Blake had answered. “I just feel worse and worse.

“This is actually great that you recognize the process,” the therapist told him, “because once you recognize it, you can change it.”

“How?” Blake had actually been intrigued.

“Once you know the pattern, you can catch yourself. You can tell yourself that this is your depression pattern, and then you can remind yourself that you don’t have to make yourself feel worse for what you are depressed about. You can remind yourself that you have depression and that this is what it does, but you don’t have to follow it and make yourself feel worse. You can begin to change direction.”

Blake had considered this. He actually invoked it in the week following that session. And that week, he wrote more than ever.

This Week

“It was a little better.”

The words resonate in my brain.

“A little better is a nice place to be,” the therapist acknowledges.

“Yes, I guess it is,” Blake agrees. Then, amazingly, he goes on to actually talk with the therapist for the entire hour. I watch them interact as they discuss plans for the week, specific ways the hubby and I are a pain as parents, and Blake’s love of video games. I am amazed as I watch my son engage. 

Spontaneously, Blake and the therapist get up from their chairs and head to the therapist’s computer to watch an animation the therapist wants to show Blake. I stay behind for a minute or two and observe. I feel my eyes burn and well up with tears. I haven’t seen this in so long and it feels so good to see glimmers of happy on Blake’s face. And then I stand up to join them.